Jul
21
2014

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood :

Jul
21
2014

Reblogged from centuriespast :

allmesopotamia:

The Oldest Known Tablet Containing a Legal Code
“The Code of Ur-Nammu is the oldest known tablet containing a law code surviving today. It was written in the Sumerian language ca. 2100-2050 BC. Although the preface directly credits the laws to king Ur-Nammu of Ur (2112-2095 BC), some historians think they should rather be ascribed to his son Shulgi.
"The first copy of the code, in two fragments found at Nippur, was translated by Samuel Kramer in 1952; owing to its partial preservation, only the prologue and 5 of the laws were discernible. Further tablets were found in Ur and translated in 1965, allowing some 40 of the 57 laws to be reconstructed. Another copy found in Sippar contains slight variants.
"Although it is known that earlier law-codes existed, such as the Code of Urukagina, this represents the earliest legal text that is extant. It predated the Code of Hammurabi by some three centuries.
"The laws are arranged in casuistic form of if-(crime), then-(punishment) — a pattern to be followed in nearly all subsequent codes. For the oldest extant law-code known to history, it is considered remarkably advanced, because it institutes fines of monetary compensation for bodily damage, as opposed to the later lex talionis (‘eye for an eye’) principle of Babylonian law; however, the capital crimes of murder, robbery, adultery and rape are punished with death.
"The code reveals a glimpse at societal structure during the ‘Sumerian Renaissance’. Beneath the lu-gal (‘great man’ or king), all members of society belonged to one of two basic strata: The ‘lu’ or free person, and the slave (male, arad; female geme). The son of a lu was called a dumu-nita until he married, becoming a ‘young man’ (gurus). A woman (munus) went from being a daughter (dumu-mi), to a wife (dam), then if she outlived her husband, a widow (nu-ma-su) who could remarry” (Wikipedia article on Code of Ur-Nammu, accessed 02-04-2009).

allmesopotamia:

The Oldest Known Tablet Containing a Legal Code

The Code of Ur-Nammu is the oldest known tablet containing a law code surviving today. It was written in the Sumerian language ca. 2100-2050 BC. Although the preface directly credits the laws to king Ur-Nammu of Ur (2112-2095 BC), some historians think they should rather be ascribed to his son Shulgi.

"The first copy of the code, in two fragments found at Nippur, was translated by Samuel Kramer in 1952; owing to its partial preservation, only the prologue and 5 of the laws were discernible. Further tablets were found in Ur and translated in 1965, allowing some 40 of the 57 laws to be reconstructed. Another copy found in Sippar contains slight variants.

"Although it is known that earlier law-codes existed, such as the Code of Urukagina, this represents the earliest legal text that is extant. It predated the Code of Hammurabi by some three centuries.

"The laws are arranged in casuistic form of if-(crime), then-(punishment) — a pattern to be followed in nearly all subsequent codes. For the oldest extant law-code known to history, it is considered remarkably advanced, because it institutes fines of monetary compensation for bodily damage, as opposed to the later lex talionis (‘eye for an eye’) principle of Babylonian law; however, the capital crimes of murder, robbery, adultery and rape are punished with death.

"The code reveals a glimpse at societal structure during the ‘Sumerian Renaissance’. Beneath the lu-gal (‘great man’ or king), all members of society belonged to one of two basic strata: The ‘lu’ or free person, and the slave (male, arad; female geme). The son of a lu was called a dumu-nita until he married, becoming a ‘young man’ (gurus). A woman (munus) went from being a daughter (dumu-mi), to a wife (dam), then if she outlived her husband, a widow (nu-ma-su) who could remarry” (Wikipedia article on Code of Ur-Nammu, accessed 02-04-2009).

(Source: historyofinformation.com)

Jul
20
2014

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood :

bestfunny:

tastefullyoffensive:

Photoshop Battle: Otter Running Towards Camera [psb]

Previously: President Obama Playing Ping Pong Photoshop Battle

 

Jul
19
2014

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood :

skeet skeet skeet

skeet skeet skeet

(Source: gifdrome)

Jul
17
2014

Moon-Shuttle Conductor - a man can dream…

Jul
11
2014

Reblogged from yahoonewsphotos :

yahoonewsphotos:

The currency collages of C. K. Wilde

Artist C. K. Wilde creates intricate collage compositions using pieces of paper currency from all over the world. His collages have referenced subjects ranging from space exploration, to mythology, religion, slavery, ecology, the history of warfare, the history of money, and art history.

C.K. Wilde: "My fetishization of paper money comes from my childhood. I traveled to Europe often to visit my relatives. When I returned, I often still had money from the places where I traveled. An attempt to buy candy with Deutsche Marks in the U.S. brought into sharp relief the inherent contradictions of nationalism and international travel. Are we not one people on our one planet? I thought. Why is this money powerful only in one context, useless in another?" (Yahoo News)

Find more news related pictures in our photo galleries and follow us on Tumblr

Jul
9
2014

Reblogged from archaeologicalnews :

Archaeologists hit the jackpot first time with Roman bath find at Segedunum Roman Fort

archaeologicalnews:

image

Organisers behind the WallQuest project have spent years knowing that a Roman bath, containing a steam room, cold and tepid rooms and a gym on the outside of the walls of Segedunum Roman Fort, was somewhere near the grounds of a demolished pub.

Extensive detective work by volunteers persuaded…

Jul
8
2014
Jul
8
2014
Jul
8
2014

Posts I like:

See more stuff I like...

 

Theme by Lauren Ashpole