Jul
27
2014
Jul
27
2014

Reblogged from architectural-review :

architectural-review:

Recicling Expo Village_Baquera, Cardona, Folli, Marullo_2014

architectural-review:

Recicling Expo Village_Baquera, Cardona, Folli, Marullo_2014

Jul
27
2014

Reblogged from art-of-swords :

art-of-swords:

Parade Falchion 

  • Dated: partly circa 1600
  • Measurements: overall length 77.5 cm; blade length 62.8 cm

Made in the Milanese style, the sword features a heavy blade struck with three spurious marks at the ricasso. The iron hilt, including vertically recurved fluted quillons cast in relief, comes with the tips formed as Turk’s heads, chiselled moulded fluted iron grip, and fitted with a Moor’s head pommel. The latter is finely chiselled, featuring a diadem and elaborately plaited hairpiece, the details picked-out in gold damascening (originally gem-set about the basal collar). 

Source: Copyright © 2014 Hermann Historica

Jul
27
2014

Reblogged from theniftyfifties :

theniftyfifties:

Disneyland, 1956.

theniftyfifties:

Disneyland, 1956.

(Source: Flickr / kjohansen)

Jul
25
2014

Reblogged from 70sscifiart :

magictransistor:

Chesley Bonestell (1888–1986)

Jul
25
2014

Reblogged from ancientpeoples :

ancientpeoples:

Gold diadem of twisted ribbons with a Herakles knot
Greek
c.300-280 BCSaid to be from the island of Mílos, Aegean Sea
Marking a moment of transition
This unusual and lovely diadem is made up of three long sheets of gold twisted to form ribbons on each side of a Herakles knot. The Herakles knot is found in Greek jewellery from the Mycenaean period, but became particularly popular in the fourth century BC. Its symbolism is closely connected with marriage, and the knot that tied the bride’s garment and was untied by the groom. In many cultures the tying or untying of knots marks moments of transition, whether from maiden to married woman or even from life to death. The untying of knots is also connected with the easing of childbirth.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Gold diadem of twisted ribbons with a Herakles knot

Greek

c.300-280 BC
Said to be from the island of Mílos, Aegean Sea

Marking a moment of transition

This unusual and lovely diadem is made up of three long sheets of gold twisted to form ribbons on each side of a Herakles knot. The Herakles knot is found in Greek jewellery from the Mycenaean period, but became particularly popular in the fourth century BC. Its symbolism is closely connected with marriage, and the knot that tied the bride’s garment and was untied by the groom. In many cultures the tying or untying of knots marks moments of transition, whether from maiden to married woman or even from life to death. The untying of knots is also connected with the easing of childbirth.

Source: British Museum

Jul
21
2014

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood :

Jul
21
2014

Reblogged from centuriespast :

allmesopotamia:

The Oldest Known Tablet Containing a Legal Code
“The Code of Ur-Nammu is the oldest known tablet containing a law code surviving today. It was written in the Sumerian language ca. 2100-2050 BC. Although the preface directly credits the laws to king Ur-Nammu of Ur (2112-2095 BC), some historians think they should rather be ascribed to his son Shulgi.
"The first copy of the code, in two fragments found at Nippur, was translated by Samuel Kramer in 1952; owing to its partial preservation, only the prologue and 5 of the laws were discernible. Further tablets were found in Ur and translated in 1965, allowing some 40 of the 57 laws to be reconstructed. Another copy found in Sippar contains slight variants.
"Although it is known that earlier law-codes existed, such as the Code of Urukagina, this represents the earliest legal text that is extant. It predated the Code of Hammurabi by some three centuries.
"The laws are arranged in casuistic form of if-(crime), then-(punishment) — a pattern to be followed in nearly all subsequent codes. For the oldest extant law-code known to history, it is considered remarkably advanced, because it institutes fines of monetary compensation for bodily damage, as opposed to the later lex talionis (‘eye for an eye’) principle of Babylonian law; however, the capital crimes of murder, robbery, adultery and rape are punished with death.
"The code reveals a glimpse at societal structure during the ‘Sumerian Renaissance’. Beneath the lu-gal (‘great man’ or king), all members of society belonged to one of two basic strata: The ‘lu’ or free person, and the slave (male, arad; female geme). The son of a lu was called a dumu-nita until he married, becoming a ‘young man’ (gurus). A woman (munus) went from being a daughter (dumu-mi), to a wife (dam), then if she outlived her husband, a widow (nu-ma-su) who could remarry” (Wikipedia article on Code of Ur-Nammu, accessed 02-04-2009).

allmesopotamia:

The Oldest Known Tablet Containing a Legal Code

The Code of Ur-Nammu is the oldest known tablet containing a law code surviving today. It was written in the Sumerian language ca. 2100-2050 BC. Although the preface directly credits the laws to king Ur-Nammu of Ur (2112-2095 BC), some historians think they should rather be ascribed to his son Shulgi.

"The first copy of the code, in two fragments found at Nippur, was translated by Samuel Kramer in 1952; owing to its partial preservation, only the prologue and 5 of the laws were discernible. Further tablets were found in Ur and translated in 1965, allowing some 40 of the 57 laws to be reconstructed. Another copy found in Sippar contains slight variants.

"Although it is known that earlier law-codes existed, such as the Code of Urukagina, this represents the earliest legal text that is extant. It predated the Code of Hammurabi by some three centuries.

"The laws are arranged in casuistic form of if-(crime), then-(punishment) — a pattern to be followed in nearly all subsequent codes. For the oldest extant law-code known to history, it is considered remarkably advanced, because it institutes fines of monetary compensation for bodily damage, as opposed to the later lex talionis (‘eye for an eye’) principle of Babylonian law; however, the capital crimes of murder, robbery, adultery and rape are punished with death.

"The code reveals a glimpse at societal structure during the ‘Sumerian Renaissance’. Beneath the lu-gal (‘great man’ or king), all members of society belonged to one of two basic strata: The ‘lu’ or free person, and the slave (male, arad; female geme). The son of a lu was called a dumu-nita until he married, becoming a ‘young man’ (gurus). A woman (munus) went from being a daughter (dumu-mi), to a wife (dam), then if she outlived her husband, a widow (nu-ma-su) who could remarry” (Wikipedia article on Code of Ur-Nammu, accessed 02-04-2009).

(Source: historyofinformation.com)

Jul
20
2014

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood :

bestfunny:

tastefullyoffensive:

Photoshop Battle: Otter Running Towards Camera [psb]

Previously: President Obama Playing Ping Pong Photoshop Battle

 

Jul
19
2014

Reblogged from ruinedchildhood :

skeet skeet skeet

skeet skeet skeet

(Source: gifdrome)

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